Sticky-out bits

A listener was getting interviewed on the radio. Her husband to-be had organised their honeymoon, but had only told her it was for 23 days, not where they were going. She had stipulated that whatever their destination, it must be hot, and had packed a load of bikinis in preparation. I wondered how many bikinis one needed for 23 days, but that was largely beside the point.

Later in the day the musician and producer Thundercat was getting interviewed on the same station. He claimed to be wearing little more than a

sequined jacket and a banana hammock.

Budgie smugglers I’d heard of, but banana hammock was new to me.

Anyway …
It got me thinking …
Why is it that…?

A woman can wear skimpy, skin-tight swimwear, tight jeans, or clothes of pretty much any kind that emphasise his body shape, and if she receives any criticism, it is likely to be if she is regarded as overweight.
A man wearing skimpy, skin-tight swimwear, tight jeans, or clothes of pretty much any kind that emphasise his body shape, will almost certainly be pilloried with derision, no matter whether he is overweight or in Atlasesque.

Women have gender specific sticky-out bits.
Men have gender specific sticky-out bits.
It’s eminently easy to come up with explanations for how Western Society has ended up revearing one and reviled by the other, but perhaps it’s time for a change.

Vive le hamac de banane!

2 Responses to “Sticky-out bits”

  1. My opinion is that men are so much more visual than women – pretty much we’ll love it when they wear something skimpy no matter their shape (more skin is better). Which kind of explains the difference in how men and women react to seeing a woman showing some cleavage or leg, or wear tight clothes: for men it is a visual delight; for women it’s an expression of themselves, and any grown man wouldn’t look at her in anything but an admirable view of her feminist power. (I’ll probably get flamed for this, so feel free to delete.)

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